News » Archives » 2016

New Method Improves Stability, Extends Shelf Life Of Protein Drugs

Gaining access to important biopharmaceuticals needed to treat illnesses and autoimmune diseases is one of the biggest obstacles developing countries face. Now, a study led by Matthew Webber, assistant professor in Notre Dame’s Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and appearing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reveals a new way to improve the stability of common protein drugs and extend shelf life.

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Eli Lilly Faculty Fellowship Provides Drug Discovery Experience

Diabetes is a metabolic disease in which the body has an inability to produce enough insulin. In the United States alone, it is estimated that the illness affects nearly 30 million diagnosed and undiagnosed people, and treatment often includes patients using an intravenous or IV method to get insulin into their system. This uncomfortable and inconvenient form of treatment can require anywhere from two to four injections a day, but a Notre Dame researcher is working to combat this problem with a less frequent, oral delivery system.

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Notre Dame Student Researcher Participates in Biomedical Entrepreneurship Crash Course

Each year, SPARK, a Stanford University initiative that provides the education and mentorship in order to advance research discoveries from the bench to the bedside, hosts a diverse group to participate in a 12-day training course in biotech innovation and entrepreneurship. The program provides an understanding of how biotechnology products, such as medical devices, food science, and general medical science, and companies are created, established, managed, advertised, and funded. Ricardo Romero, graduate student of the Integrated Biomedical Sciences program and researcher in the Harper Cancer Research Institute, had the opportunity to attend the program through the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (Indiana CTSI).

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Understanding the Molecular Structure of Compounds in order to Advance Discovery of New Medicines and More

At the University of Notre Dame, the Molecular Structure Facility (MSF) analyzes organic or inorganic substances at an atomic level, which allows researchers to learn about the three-dimensional structure and connectivity of the compound they have created. Knowing the molecular make-up of substances oftentimes provides faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students information about whether or not their substance is actually what was intended or even to see if their research is heading in the right direction.

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Collecting Compounds for the Treatment of Rare Genetic Disorders

As Richard Taylor completes a three-year term as associate vice president for research in June of this year, he will continue his research on drug discovery for rare genetic diseases, like NGLY1 deficiency, when he and other members of the Warren Family Research Center for Drug Discovery and Development move into the building this summer. 

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Graduate Student Internship Opportunities as GSK

2016 Heart Failure & Muscle Metabolism DPU Chemistry Co-Op positions

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The Heart Fail Failure and Muscle Metabolism Discovery Performance Units are offering full-time, 12-month co-op positions located at our Upper Merion campus in Pennsylvania. The primary focus of the placement will be the chemical synthesis of organic molecules to produce novel drug candidates, however as a member of our multi-disciplinary team you will also gain insight into the broader aspects of the drug discovery process. This is an excellent opportunity to extend your skill set in preparation for securing employment post-graduation.…

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Ara Parseghian Medical Research Fund launches at Notre Dame

Marcia Christy Michael Parseghian

Building on the partnership that the University of Notre Dame formed with the Ara Parseghian Medical Research Foundation in 2010, the University has now established the Ara Parseghian Medical Research Fund and is moving the administrative functions and granting process of the foundation from Tucson, Arizona, to Notre Dame.

Through this partnership, the Parseghian family will continue their fight to find a cure or treatment for Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) disease and will continue to help fundraise and support researchers around the world.

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Ebola Research at Notre Dame, IU School of Medicine Funded by Indiana CTSI

The Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (CTSI) has provided support for Olaf Wiest, University of Notre Dame professor of chemistry and biochemistry, and Robert Stahelin, Indiana University School of Medicine associate professor of biochemistry and molecular biology and adjunct associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry at Notre Dame, through the Notre Dame-CTSI Project Development Team.

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Warren Center highlighted during NDday

The Warren Family Research Center for Drug Discovery and Development will be highlighted during the 10am hour, Monday, April 25th, live streaming NDday fundraising event. Please consider supporting the Warren Center during this opportunity.  All funds go directly to support laboratory research including our collaboration with the Grace Science Foundation

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Second Chance Grant Funding

Give Your Application a Second Chance With OnPAR

If your meritorious application misses NIH's payline, a new private-public partnership pilot called Online Partnership to Accelerate Research (OnPAR) could offer a second chance to receive funding.

How OnPAR Helps

Onpar

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Rare Disease Day and Rare Disease Research within the Warren Center

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Rare Disease Day takes place annually on the last day of February. Rare Disease Day’s goal is to raise awareness amongst the general public and decision-makers about rare diseases and their impact on patients. Warren Center researchers have a rich history in rare disease therapeutic research and a few examples are summarized below.…

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New avenues found for treatment of pathogen behind diseases including fasciitis, toxic shock syndrome

Scanning electron micrograph of red blood cell hemolysis by the Streptolysin S producing Group A Streptococcus. Credit: Shaun Lee, Dustin Higashi

One bacterial pathogen is responsible for a range of diseases, from pharyngitis and impetigo to more severe diagnoses such as toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis (flesh eating disease), a serious bacterial skin infection that spreads quickly and kills the body’s soft tissue. The pathogen, known as Group A Streptococcus, remains a global health burden with an estimated 700 million cases reported annually, and more than half a million deaths due to severe infections.

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